2020 NHL Draft

Dylan Holloway

Wisconsin Badgers (Big-10)

Steve Kournianos  |  10/27/2019 |  Nashville  |  

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Profile

Position: Left Wing/Center
Shoots: Left
Height / Weight: 6’1, 192 lbs
Born: September 23rd, 2001 | Bragg Creek, AB
Nation: Canada

The Draft Analyst Ranking:

PRE AUG NOV DEC APR JUN
6 8 8

Regular Season

SEASON TEAM GP G A PTS P/G +/- PPG SHG GWG GTG PIM
2017-18  Canada Red (WU17HC) 6 1 0 1 0.17 0
2017-18 Canada West (U20 WJAC) 5 2 1 3 0.6 2
2017-18 Okotoks Oilers (AJHL) 28 11 16 27 1 E 2 0 2 0 16
2018-19 Canada (U18 Hlinka) 5 1 2 3 0.6 2
2018-19 Canada West (U20 WJAC) 6 2 3 5 0.83 8
2018-19 Okotoks Oilers (AJHL) 53 40 48 88 1.7 E 8 0 6 0 56
2018-19 Canada (U18 WC) 7 2 2 4 0.57 3 0 0 0 10
2019-20 Wisconsin (Big-10) 6 1 2 3 0.5 -1 0 0 0 0 8

Scouting Report

A hard-working power forward with a strong sense for the game, Holloway was one of the top players in Canadian Junior “A” for the AJHL’s Okotoks Oilers before beginning his draft year as a freshman for the University of Wisconsin. Blessed with ideal size and excellent balance, Holloway is a jack of all trades who can play either center or wing; serve as a playmaker or finish around the net; and most importantly, be matched up against opposing top players. Although his start with the Badgers has yet to produce eye-popping stats, one must consider his ability to impact shifts without denting the scoresheet. Additionally, he was a key figure in a Wisconsin recruiting class that also included forwards Alex Turcotte, Cole Caufield, and Owen Lindmark, so there is only so much puck for these talented underclassmen to share.

Holloway is a hound off the puck who consistently applies pressure with physicality, especially on the penalty kill. He gets involved on the forecheck and creates turnovers thanks to smart reads, proper stick positioning and quick turns towards the direction of puck travel. Holloway has proven to be effective in various types of zone-coverage schemes and usually stays within the system being implemented. By watching him react to puck movement accordingly while maintaining positional flexibility, you get the sense that Holloway is not trying to do everyone’s job and listens to the coaching staff’s instructions.

Once he has the puck under control, Holloway features a relatively wide skating base and accelerates with a powerful stride and above-average straight-line speed. His first step is quick, and he can make instant directional changes, tight turns, and pivot on a dime while moving at top speed, all while maintaining control of the puck during these difficult maneuvers. His skating most certainly is a strong suit, and his escapability along the boards while taking hard shoves reveals his elite balance.

Born into a family with NHL bloodlines — his father Bruce briefly played for the Vancouver Canucks in 1985 — Dylan is a very good playmaker with excellent vision. He is an accurate passer who also can create chances off his backhand, and he plays with his head up at all times. Holloway’s aforementioned positioning is critical to his ability to retrieve pucks and jumpstart the attack into open ice, but he’s also proven to turn seemingly-harmless board battles into a a prime opportunity near the net for his linemates or a cutting defender. On the power play, Holloway can orchestrate from the half wall or behind the net, but from the circles he owns an excellent shot (either wrister or slapshot) that makes him difficult to predict. He uses his size to his advantage when battling for low-slot positioning, and his competitiveness in one-on-one battles typically spells trouble for opponents. One underrated aspect of his game is his trickery with the puck in tight spaces, as he is confident enough to try and slip backdoor or blind passes through the legs of unassuming defenders.